Smoking in your car: the dangers are not just in your house

If you own a car, there’s one thing that you can be sure of; eventually, you will wind up with smokers in your car. They might be friends or family members who are just trying to be helpful by driving people around, but it’s time to let them know about the dangers of smoking in your car and how they can avoid creating hazardous conditions when they decide to light up while riding in your vehicle. It’s important that they know because even if you commit to regularly getting your car detailed, you will still be exposed to odorless toxins every time you sit in your car.

Thinking about smoking in your car may not sound like it’s much of a concern, but the truth is that smoking in your car poses just as many health risks to you and your passengers as smoking at home. In fact, when the smoke particles settle on your upholstery and other surfaces, they create something called thirdhand smoke – which can be just as dangerous as first- or secondhand smoke because it lingers long after the cigarette has been extinguished.

Outline

  • The Truth About Smoking in Cars
  • The Health Risks of Thirdhand Smoke
  • New Car Smell vs. Old-Car Smell
  • What Does Smoke Odor Do To My Car?
  • 5 Ways to Remove Odors From Your Car
  • Tips on How Not To Buy A Used Car That Was Smoked In
  • How To Tell If A Used Car Has Been Smoked In

The Truth About Smoking in Cars

We all know that smoking is bad for us. However, new research suggests that smoking inside a vehicle maybe even more dangerous than thought. According to a study from 2014, if an individual smokes inside of their vehicle and parks it outside, toxins remain attached to surfaces for up to two weeks after smoking has stopped. These lingering toxins are known as thirdhand smoke or environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and have been linked to disease and health problems.

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The Health Risks of Thirdhand Smoke

Of course, it’s always best to never smoke in your car. The good news is that getting rid of the tobacco smell is easier than you think! Contact a detailing service such as Carpet Fresh. With a quick treatment from them, you’ll be free of thirdhand smoke and ready to start driving safely again. They have locations all over Tulsa, OK, so don’t hesitate to call one today!

New Car Smell vs. Old-Car Smell

Why Newer Isn’t Always Better! One of our biggest preferences when buying a used vehicle is its smell. Fresh out of a dealership, new cars smell like leather and plastic; used cars, on the other hand, have an odor that resembles smoke or stale food. It’s almost unbearable to sit inside a smelly car. However, many people seem to buy them anyway! But what if I told you there was a way to remove that odor?

What Does Smoke Odor Do To My Car?

The dangers of thirdhand smoke are real. But you can’t see it or smell it, making it difficult to identify and address. Luckily, there’s a solution—one that won’t break your budget. Read on to learn more about thirdhand smoke and how odor removal works to get rid of it for good.

Ways to Remove Odors From Your Car

There is no way to eliminate thirdhand smoke in a vehicle, but there are steps you can take to reduce how often you smell it. The most important step is to never smoke inside your vehicle. If you have smokers as passengers, they should always be asked to smoke outside, preferably on a covered patio or somewhere else that has good ventilation.

Tips on How Not To Buy A Used Car That Was Smoked In

If you’re looking to buy a used vehicle, it’s always a good idea to bring along someone who knows how to spot signs of damage. While those with expertise can typically see if a vehicle has been wrecked, they may not be able to spot a vehicle that was smoked in. So, unless you have experience with finding out if cars were smoked in, here are some tips for what you should look for and questions you should ask when shopping for a used automobile.

How To Tell If A Used Car Has Been Smoked In

It smells bad. So even if you commit to regularly getting your car detailed, you will still be exposed to odorless toxins every time you sit in your car. Your best option is to not buy a used vehicle that you suspect was smoked — but how do you know for sure? It’s difficult, especially if it’s a friend’s old beater. Here are a few ways to tell for sure whether or not a used vehicle has been smoked in: They look dirty—even after they’ve been detailed.

Conclusion

It’s true that your clothes and home are not the only things that will smell of smoke if you smoke indoors, but your car will smell too! As if that weren’t bad enough, it turns out that even if you commit to regularly getting your car detailed, you will still be exposed to odorless toxins every time you sit in your car. Your best option is to not buy a used vehicle that you suspect was smoked in, but if it’s too late, read on to find out what health effects you might encounter from being exposed to thirdhand smoke residues.

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